SEEKING NECTAR

CHIRP BATTLE AND HUM

The ruby-throated hummingbirds usually arrive in May and depart in October. And, for six glorious months of the year, they have my undivided attention as they visit the plants and perches on the patio.

The patio garden began several years ago with a plastic feeder, a potted plant and the hope to create a sanctuary for both bird and observer.

Today, the patio has been transformed into a container garden featuring several nectar feeders, a vibrant array of salvia, a colorful group of other annuals and an assortment of perches for the birds to lord over their surroundings.

Each container is numbered, placed in its designated spot and the birds and their behaviors are meticulously logged in a spreadsheet.

Despite their diminutive size, ruby-throated hummingbirds appear to be fiercely independent loners, showing little tolerance for other birds encroaching upon their territory on this patio.

Yet, these tiny tyrants may perch on your finger while feeding or hover in your face while chirping at you.

They are the backyard bully bird I never knew I needed.

Patio Life began with a question, “Why is the wasp eating the wood chair?” Now, a new question arose, “Do hummingbirds prefer feeders or flowers?” Since I like numbers, I embarked on a mission to uncover the answer.

After four seasons of observation, tallying over 8,000 visits, the statistics have been analyzed and the question answered—at least on this patio.

Ruby-throated Hummingbird
Ruby-throated Hummingbird

PATIO LIFE

IF YOU PLANT IT – THEY WILL COME